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Teacher Credibility: How Presentation Modalities affect Teacher Education Students’ Perceived Credibility of Information
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, , University of Nevada, Reno, United States

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, in Austin, Texas, USA ISBN 978-1-880094-92-1 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

Abstract: The following research examined whether or not, all else being equal, the modality of information delivery has an impact on its perceived credibility among teacher education students of two age groups: (>25 and <25). A piece of fabricated information was formatted, with the exact same content and from the same source, into three modalities; (a) face-to-face lecture (b) print via paper, and (c) print via World Wide Web. The formatted information was delivered separately to three randomly assigned groups of undergraduate and graduate teacher education students. After the information was delivered the students completed a self-report survey instrument that recorded their perceptions of the credibility of the formatted information. No significance was found between the mean differences in the credibility scores of participants in the two age groups. However, significant main effects for modality were found. The credibility scores were significantly higher for the print via paper modality than both the face-to-face lecture and the print via World Wide Web modalities.

Citation

Sexton, J. & Maddux, C. (2012). Teacher Credibility: How Presentation Modalities affect Teacher Education Students’ Perceived Credibility of Information. In P. Resta (Ed.), Proceedings of SITE 2012--Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 4172-4178). Austin, Texas, USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved August 20, 2019 from .

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