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Virtual Schooling Standards and Best Practices for Teacher Education Article

, , University of Florida, United States ; , University of North Carolina Charlotte, United States ; , , University of Florida, United States

Journal of Technology and Teacher Education Volume 17, Number 4, ISSN 1059-7069 Publisher: Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education, Waynesville, NC USA

Abstract

Abstract: The number of students taking online courses in K-12 has increased exponentially since the inception of virtual schools in 1996. However, K-12 virtual schooling is a relatively new concept for those involved in teacher education. As teacher education departments build pre-service preparation programs, in-service professional development opportunities, and state-wide endorsements and certifications, they will need to do so with a firm grasp of existing standards and practices within the field. This paper describes several major attempts to form standards and best practices. In doing so, it also explores the research backing and the need for additional research to support such standards. The paper concludes with a discussion about the various roles future teachers might play in virtual school work and the associated standards that would guide their instruction.

Citation

Ferdig, R.E., Cavanaugh, C., DiPietro, M., Black, E.W. & Dawson, K. (2009). Virtual Schooling Standards and Best Practices for Teacher Education. Journal of Technology and Teacher Education, 17(4), 479-503. Waynesville, NC USA: Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education. Retrieved September 20, 2017 from .

Keywords

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