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Impacting Academic Achievement with Student Learners Teaching Digital Storytelling to Others: The ATTTCSE Digital Video Project ARTICLE

, Brock University, Canada ; , University of Louisiana at Lafayette, United States ; , Starkville School District, United States

CITE Journal Volume 10, Number 1, ISSN 1528-5804 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE)

Abstract

University researchers, teacher candidates, language and technology instructors, student learners, and families from diverse backgrounds partnered in an invitational teaching/learning experience—middle school student learners teaching their VIPs (very important persons) how to create stories and construct digital movies with reference to their family history. Prior to a university-based workshop, 2 weeks of structured activities using the Model of Digital Storytelling (Figg, 2005) focused on rich language development, oral history, and movie-making technology in a community-based summer enrichment program designed for underachieving student learners. Teacher candidates facilitated the workshop interaction between student learners and their VIPs. Data sources included interviews, exit surveys, reflective journals, research field notes, and student/parent-created artifacts. All participants were positively impacted through this digital storytelling process. Noted improvement of writing and technical skills, increased motivation due to VIP involvement, and greater awareness of future educational opportunities for student learners were among the key findings of this study.

Citation

Figg, C., McCartney, R. & Gonsoulin, W. (2010). Impacting Academic Achievement with Student Learners Teaching Digital Storytelling to Others: The ATTTCSE Digital Video Project. Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education, 10(1), 38-79. Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE).

Keywords

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