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Technological Constraints and Implementation Barriers of Using Videoconferencing for Virtual Teaching in New Zealand Secondary Schools
Article

, , University of Otago College of Education, New Zealand

Journal of Technology and Teacher Education Volume 17, Number 4, ISSN 1059-7069 Publisher: Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education, Waynesville, NC USA

Abstract

Nine New Zealand secondary schools participated in the OtagoNet project, using videoconferencing technologies to deliver courses to multiple sites. This paper reports findings from a study conducted between 2001 and 2004 to evaluate the effectiveness of OtagoNet. It was found that videoconferencing technology had a significant impact on pedagogy and teaching styles. Also, the use of videoconferencing in and of itself did not necessarily increase teacher-student or student-student interaction. The importance of the teacher in implementing and integrating technology into the learning environment was highlighted in this project.

Citation

Lai, K.W. & Pratt, K. (2009). Technological Constraints and Implementation Barriers of Using Videoconferencing for Virtual Teaching in New Zealand Secondary Schools. Journal of Technology and Teacher Education, 17(4), 505-522. Waynesville, NC USA: Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education. Retrieved April 22, 2019 from .

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These links are based on references which have been extracted automatically and may have some errors. If you see a mistake, please contact info@learntechlib.org.