You are here:

Social Constructivism and Transformative Learning Theories in the development of Online Instructors: Best Andragogical Practices
PROCEEDINGS

, Western Governors University, United States

EdMedia + Innovate Learning, in Vancouver, Canada ISBN 978-1-880094-62-4 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Waynesville, NC

Abstract

Adult learning theories of Social Constructivism and Transformative Learning have informed adult educators regarding best instructional practices in the face-to-face classroom environment. These theories have become pertinent in regards to practices of adult educators in the online environment, in which facilitators and students rarely meet in a face-to-face environment. Little research has been conducted that establishes a meaningful connection between best practices in the education of adult learners in an online environment and the best practices in the professional development of adult educators in an online environment. Both groups have similar learning and development needs. This paper will examine the relevance of adult learning theory in the development and supervision of faculty charged with teaching in an online environment. Furthermore, a series of best practices, based in adult learning theory, will be proposed regarding the leadership of remote online faculty members.

Citation

Zappala, A. (2007). Social Constructivism and Transformative Learning Theories in the development of Online Instructors: Best Andragogical Practices. In C. Montgomerie & J. Seale (Eds.), Proceedings of ED-MEDIA 2007--World Conference on Educational Multimedia, Hypermedia & Telecommunications (pp. 2487-2493). Vancouver, Canada: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved December 17, 2018 from .

Keywords

View References & Citations Map

References

  1. Baker, R. (2005). An analysis of the development of self-regulation in distance learning. In M. Clay, C. Fearrington, & J. Gubbins (eds.), Distance Learning Administration Annual& Conference Proceedings 2005 (pp. 23-34). Carrollton, Georgia: University of West Georgia Press.
  2. Brookfield, S. (2005). Using the workplace as a resource for thinking and learning. In Critical Thinking in Adult Education (Capella University). Hoboken, New Jersey: John Wiley and Sons, Inc.
  3. Brookfield, S., & Preskill, S. (1999). Discussion as a way of teaching: Tools and techniques for democratic classrooms. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.
  4. Bruffee, K. (1999). Collaborative learning: Higher education, interdependence, and the authority of knowledge (2nd ed.). Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University Press.
  5. Cranton, P. (1994). Understanding and promoting transformative learning: A guide for educators of adults. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.
  6. DuCharme-Hansen, B., & Dupin-Bryant, P. (2004). Web-based distance education for adults. Malabar, Florida: Krieger Publishing. Duffy, T.M., & Jonassen, D.H. (1992). Constructivism and the technology of instruction: A conversation. Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum.
  7. Gutek, G. (2004). Philosophical and ideological voices in education. New York: Pearson.
  8. Hixon, E. (2005) Collaborative online course development: The faculty experience. Ph.D. Dissertation, Indiana University, United States--Indiana. Retrieved August 28, 2006, from ProQuest Digital Dissertations database. (Publication No. AAT 3167808).
  9. Imel, S. (1998). Transformative Learning in Adulthood. Retrieved on August 13, 2004 from http://www.ericfacility.net/ericdigests/ed423426.html.
  10. Knowles, M., Holton, E., & Swanson, R. (2005). The adult learner: The definitive classic in adult education and human resource development. New York: Elsevier.
  11. Kuck, G. (2005) Barriers to implementing distance education: A case study in the community colleges. Ed.D. Dissertation, University of Southern California, United States--California. Retrieved August 21, 2006, from ProQuest Digital Dissertations database. (Publication No. AAT 3196833).
  12. McClean, J. (2005). Forgotten faculty: Stress and job satisfaction among distance educators. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, Capella University.
  13. Mezirow, J. (1975). Education for perspective transformation: Women’s re-entry programs in community colleges. New York: Center for Adult Education, Teachers College, Columbia University.
  14. Mezirow, J. (1991). Transformative dimensions of adult learning. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.
  15. Oliver, C. (2004) Teaching at a distance: The online faculty work environment. Ph.D. Dissertation, City University of New York, United States--New York. Retrieved August 29, 2006, from ProQuest Digital Dissertations database. (Publication No. AAT 3127906).
  16. Ormrod, J. (2004). In Learning Theory and the Educational Process (Capella University). Upper Saddle River, New Jersey: Merrill– Prentice Hall.
  17. Palloff, R., & Pratt, K. (2001). Lessons from the Cyberspace classroom: The realities of online teaching. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.
  18. Palloff, R., & Pratt, K. (2003). The virtual student: A profile and guide to working with online learners. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.
  19. Simonson, M., Smaldino, S., Albright, M., & Zvacek, S. (2003). Teaching and learning at a distance: Foundations of distance education. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey: Merrill Prentice Hall.
  20. Whicker, T. (2004) Critical issues in Internet-based distance learning in community colleges: Perceptions of problems and strategies for solving those problems. Ed.D. Dissertation, New Mexico State University, United States--New Mexico. Retrieved September 1, 2006, from ProQuest Digital Dissertations database. (Publication No. AAT 3129911).
  21. Zappala, A., & Smolka, J. (2005). Creating and maintaining collaborative working relationships among online faculty: Implications for professional development and faculty retention. In M. Clay, C. Fearrington, & J. Gubbins (eds.), Distance Learning Administration Annual& Conference Proceedings 2005 (pp. 207-209). Carrollton, Georgia: University of West Georgia Press.

These references have been extracted automatically and may have some errors. If you see a mistake in the references above, please contact info@learntechlib.org.