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The Educational Implications of Synchronous and Asynchronous Peer-Tutoring in Video Games PROCEEDINGS

, E-Learn Design Lab, University of Kansas, United States

E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education, in Honolulu, Hawaii, USA ISBN 978-1-880094-60-0 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

While the ideal of the teaching computer has occupied computer and cognitive scientists for over thirty years, the results have been underwhelming. Intelligent tutoring systems are less subtle than human tutors, less likely to attempt numerous strategies to enlighten a learner, and more likely to miss minor errors in student comprehension. However, the model of the teaching computer need not be abandoned, merely reworked. Recent developments in both synchronous and asynchronous peer-tutoring in video games indicate that future learners will receive spontaneous, free tutoring from their online-peers, a process that will enrich both parties. This paper discusses the trend of user-authored Frequently Asked Question (FAQ) guides, trainer characters, and the phenomenon of digital ludic group identity, known as clanning, and analyzes the educational implications of a growing culture of altruism centered on video games.

Citation

Moshirnia, A. (2006). The Educational Implications of Synchronous and Asynchronous Peer-Tutoring in Video Games. In T. Reeves & S. Yamashita (Eds.), Proceedings of E-Learn 2006--World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education (pp. 2952-2958). Honolulu, Hawaii, USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved September 21, 2017 from .

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