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Implications of Ubiquitous Computing for the Social Studies Curriculum
Article

, University of Virginia, United States ; , University of South Florida, United States ; , University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, United States ; , University of Virginia, United States

CITE Journal Volume 6, Number 2, ISSN 1528-5804 Publisher: Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education, Waynesville, NC USA

Abstract

In March 2002, members of the National Technology Leadership Initiative (NTLI) met in Charlottesville, Virginia to discuss the potential effects of ubiquitous computing on the field of education. Ubiquitous computing, or “on-demand availability of task-necessary computing power,” involves providing every student with a handheld computer-a situation with enormous repercussions for education and teacher education. Over a two-day period, participants engaged in intensive discussion of the issue of ubiquitous computing and developed seven conclusions. This paper, written by the representatives from social studies organizations, seeks to examine the specific implications of these seven conclusions for the field of social studies education. The paper discusses the concept of ubiquitous computing and the impact this technology shift may have on social studies curricula, teacher preparation, software development, and research agendas.

Citation

Van Hover, S., Berson, M., Mason Bolick, C. & Owings Swan, K. (2006). Implications of Ubiquitous Computing for the Social Studies Curriculum. Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education, 6(2), 275-283. Waynesville, NC USA: Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education. Retrieved March 22, 2019 from .

Keywords

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