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Literacy Practices and Digital Literacies: A Commentary on Swenson, Rozema, Young, McGrail, and Whitin
Article

, Pennsylvania State University, United States

CITE Journal Volume 6, Number 1, ISSN 1528-5804 Publisher: Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education, Waynesville, NC USA

Abstract

The integration of digital tools and multimodal representations in the English classroom has the greatest potential when we define literacy as multiple socially constructed practices. If digital literacies are defined as autonomous tools and isolated symbolic systems, reduced to a set of skills and forms for students to reproduce, then school literacy practices will become further distanced from nonschool literacy practices. Instead, English teachers should engage school literacies in which digital and nondigital tools help students inquire into how multimodal symbols are used to construct and negotiate community identities, relationships, activities, and values. Digital literacies may be especially supportive of such critical inquiry practices.

Citation

Myers, J. (2006). Literacy Practices and Digital Literacies: A Commentary on Swenson, Rozema, Young, McGrail, and Whitin. Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education, 6(1), 61-66. Waynesville, NC USA: Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education. Retrieved March 22, 2019 from .

Keywords

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References

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Cited By

  1. The (Failed) Case of the Winston Society Wikispace: Challenges and Opportunities of Web 2.0 and Teacher Education

    Jory Brass, University of Cincinnati, United States; Storey Mecoli, Boston College, United States

    Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education Vol. 11, No. 2 (June 2011) pp. 149–166

  2. The (Failed) Case of the Winston Society Wikispace: The Challenges and Opportunities of Web 2.0 and Teacher Education

    Jory Brass, University of Cincinnati, United States; Storey Mecoli, Boston College, United States

    Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2011 (Mar 07, 2011) pp. 2362–2365

  3. Video-Based Response & Revision: Dialogic Instruction Using Video and Web 2.0 Technologies

    Anne Heintz, Carlin Borsheim, Samantha Caughlan, Mary M. Juzwik & Michael B. Sherry, Michigan State University, United States

    Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education Vol. 10, No. 2 (June 2010) pp. 175–196

These links are based on references which have been extracted automatically and may have some errors. If you see a mistake, please contact info@learntechlib.org.