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The implications of family size and birth order for test scores and behavioral development
ARTICLE

Economics of Education Review Volume 29, Number 5 ISSN 0272-7757 Publisher: Elsevier Ltd

Abstract

This article, using longitudinal data from the National Child Development Study, presents new evidence on the effects of family size and birth order on test scores and behavioral development at age 7, 11 and 16. Sibling size is shown to have an adverse causal effect on test scores and behavioral development. For any given family size, first-borns ultimately obtain higher test scores than middle-born or last-born children. First-borns and last-borns tend to be better behaved at school than middle-borns, though last-borns have no test score advantage.

Citation

Silles, M.A. The implications of family size and birth order for test scores and behavioral development. Economics of Education Review, 29(5), 795-803. Elsevier Ltd. Retrieved July 20, 2019 from .

This record was imported from Economics of Education Review on March 1, 2019. Economics of Education Review is a publication of Elsevier.

Full text is availabe on Science Direct: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.econedurev.2010.02.004

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