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But can she cook? Women’s education and housework productivity
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Economics of Education Review Volume 23, Number 6 ISSN 0272-7757 Publisher: Elsevier Ltd

Abstract

Previous inquiries into the relationship between education and housework productivity reveal that expectations differ along disciplinary (i.e., economics vs. non-economics) lines and empirical results from the economics literature are mixed. Expectations of a positive sign between education and housework productivity in the economics literature may be a function of misinterpretations of [J. Polit. Economy 81 (1973) 306] original theory pertaining to all non-market production, which is far more general than just housework. Mixed empirical results may be a function of incomplete or overly assumption-reliant econometric models derived previously. We streamline the procedures for estimating the parameters of a one-person, one-period housework production function such that the system of equations may be specified with a single, literature-based assumption. Our estimation of the production function parameter that measures the effect of education on housework productivity suggests that authors in the non-economics literature may have a point; the relationship between education and housework productivity may be negative due to “morale” effects.

Citation

Sharp, D.C., Heath, J.A., Smith, W.T. & Knowlton, D.S. But can she cook? Women’s education and housework productivity. Economics of Education Review, 23(6), 605-614. Elsevier Ltd. Retrieved September 23, 2019 from .

This record was imported from Economics of Education Review on March 1, 2019. Economics of Education Review is a publication of Elsevier.

Full text is availabe on Science Direct: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.econedurev.2004.03.003

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