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Social Studies Teachers’ Perspectives of Technology Integration
Article

, Georgia State University, United States

Journal of Technology and Teacher Education Volume 15, Number 3, ISSN 1059-7069 Publisher: Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education, Waynesville, NC USA

Abstract

This qualitative research investigated the perspectives and experiences of 17 social studies teachers following technology integration training. The research indicated that the teachers held a variety of views of technology integration. These views influenced their use of technology in the classroom. Four major categories of technology-related activities were observed among participants: (a) teacher-centered, (b) structured inquiry, (c) teacher-student negotiated, and (d) student-centered. Most teachers were willing to use technology, expressed positive experiences with technology integration training, increased their use of technology in the classroom, and used technology more creatively. Despite all the advantages provided by technology, the research found that willingness to use technology and positive experiences were related to teachers' increased use of technology and to more creative use of technology, but they did not ensure that teachers would replace their teaching with technology.

Citation

Zhao, Y. (2007). Social Studies Teachers’ Perspectives of Technology Integration. Journal of Technology and Teacher Education, 15(3), 311-333. Waynesville, NC USA: Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education. Retrieved December 16, 2018 from .

Keywords

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