You are here:

Children's emotions in math problem solving situations: Contributions of self-concept, metacognitive experiences, and performance
ARTICLE

, , , Department of Psychology, Norway

Learning and Instruction Volume 39, Number 1, ISSN 0959-4752 Publisher: Elsevier Ltd

Abstract

This study examined 1) experiences of six discrete emotions ‒ joy, pride, contentment, worry, shame, hopelessness ‒ after solving a math problem of students aged 10–12 years, and 2) the contribution of self-concept, metacognitive experiences (feeling of difficulty and feeling of success) and performance on emotions experienced after the task, controlling for gender and emotions experienced before the task. Results indicated a decrease in joy and contentment after problem solving. Performance did not contribute to emotions apart from hopelessness. The influence of performance on hopelessness was mediatized by metacognitive experiences. Self-concept contributed to joy, pride and shame but its influence became non-significant when we controlled for metacognitive experiences. Feeling of success mediatized the effect of self-concept on joy, pride and shame. Metacognitive experiences were also found to be important predictors of all emotions except worry. The need for new paradigms to study emotions in education is discussed.

Citation

Tornare, E., Czajkowski, N.O. & Pons, F. (2015). Children's emotions in math problem solving situations: Contributions of self-concept, metacognitive experiences, and performance. Learning and Instruction, 39(1), 88-96. Elsevier Ltd. Retrieved October 16, 2019 from .

This record was imported from Learning and Instruction on January 29, 2019. Learning and Instruction is a publication of Elsevier.

Full text is availabe on Science Direct: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.learninstruc.2015.05.011

Keywords