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Cognitive mechanisms underlying reading and spelling development in five European orthographies
ARTICLE

, Department of Psychology, Austria ; , Laboratoire de Sciences Cognitives et Psycholinguistique, France ; , , , , , Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Germany ; , , , Department of Psychology, Finland ; , , , Institute for Psychology, Hungary ; , Laboratoire de Sciences Cognitives et Psycholinguistique, France ; , Unité de Neurologie Pédiatrique, France ; , Inserm U825, France ; , Laboratoire de Sciences Cognitives et Psycholinguistique, France ; , Laboratoire de Psychologie et NeuroCognition UMR 5105 CNRS, France ; , Centre de Référence des Troubles d'apprentissages, France ; , Centre de Référence pour les Troubles des Apprentissages, France ; , Service de Psychopathologie de l'enfant et de l'adolescent, France ; , Centre de Référence sur les Troubles des Apprentissages, France ; , , , MRC Centre for Neuropsychiatric Genetics and Genomics, United Kingdom ; , , , Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Switzerland ; , Neuroscience Center Zurich, Switzerland ; , Max Planck Institute of Psychiatry, Germany ; , Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Germany ; , Department of Psychology, Austria

Learning and Instruction Volume 29, Number 1, ISSN 0959-4752 Publisher: Elsevier Ltd

Abstract

This paper addresses the question whether the cognitive underpinnings of reading and spelling are universal or language/orthography-specific. We analyzed concurrent predictions of phonological processing (awareness and memory) and rapid automatized naming (RAN) for literacy development in a large European sample of 1062 typically developing elementary school children beyond Grade 2 acquiring five different alphabetic orthographies with varying degrees of grapheme–phoneme consistency (English, French, German, Hungarian, Finnish). Findings indicate that (1) phonological processing and RAN both account for significant amounts of unique variance in literacy attainment in all five orthographies. Associations of predictors with reading speed, reading accuracy, and spelling are differential: in general, RAN is the best predictor of reading speed while phonological processing accounts for higher amounts of unique variance in reading accuracy and spelling; (2) the predictive patterns are largely comparable across orthographies, but they tend to be stronger in English than in all other orthographies.

Citation

Moll, K., Ramus, F., Bartling, J., Bruder, J., Kunze, S., Neuhoff, N., Streiftau, S., Lyytinen, H., Leppänen, P.H.T., Lohvansuu, K., Tóth, D., Honbolygó, F., Csépe, V., Bogliotti, C., Iannuzzi, S., Démonet, J.F., Longeras, E., Valdois, S., George, F., Soares-Boucaud, I., Le Heuzey, M.F., Billard, C., O'Donovan, M., Hill, G., Williams, J., Brandeis, D., Maurer, U., Schulz, E., van der Mark, S., Müller-Myhsok, B., Schulte-Körne, G. & Landerl, K. (2014). Cognitive mechanisms underlying reading and spelling development in five European orthographies. Learning and Instruction, 29(1), 65-77. Elsevier Ltd. Retrieved November 21, 2019 from .

This record was imported from Learning and Instruction on January 29, 2019. Learning and Instruction is a publication of Elsevier.

Full text is availabe on Science Direct: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.learninstruc.2013.09.003

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