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The functions of narrative and research on teaching
ARTICLE

TATE Volume 13, Number 1 ISSN 0742-051X Publisher: Elsevier Ltd

Abstract

Narrative is a multifunctional concept and this feature of its use may create confusion when it is used by researchers to explore teachers' lives, knowledge, and experiences. Two functions are especially common in educational discourse: coercive narratives and emancipatory narratives. The former are persuasive and seek to constrain belief; the latter are expressive and offer processes for creating new meanings. In order to account for these apparently contradictory purposes, we must take a longitudinal view and endeavor to understand the contexts in which narratives arise. Important implications for research on teaching arise when narrative function is seen in terms of process. Concepts such as function, authorship, method of composition, and interpretation are stressed rather than the search for a standard of truth in narrative.

Citation

McEwan, H. The functions of narrative and research on teaching. Teaching and Teacher Education: An International Journal of Research and Studies, 13(1), 85-92. Elsevier Ltd. Retrieved December 6, 2019 from .

This record was imported from Teaching and Teacher Education: An International Journal of Research and Studies on January 29, 2019. Teaching and Teacher Education: An International Journal of Research and Studies is a publication of Elsevier.

Full text is availabe on Science Direct: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0742-051X(96)00029-7