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Telling the truth about stories
ARTICLE

TATE Volume 13, Number 1 ISSN 0742-051X Publisher: Elsevier Ltd

Abstract

This paper opens with two stories—about the “joking relationship” discovered by anthropologist Radcliffe-Brown Structure and function in primitive society. New York: The Free Press (1965), and an incident in the life of Rousseau—which illustrate that sometimes a story needs to be true, and that the opinion of an outsider can be preferable to that of the insider whose story it is. Recent papers by Carter and Polkinghorne Educational Researcher, 22(1), 5–12 (1993) and International Journal of Qualitative Studies in Education, 8(1), 5–23 (1995) are analysed; it is argued that a clear and enticing plot is no indicator of a story's truth, furthermore the need to be true can hold both of “analysis of narratives” and “narrative analysis”.

Citation

Phillips, D.C. Telling the truth about stories. Teaching and Teacher Education: An International Journal of Research and Studies, 13(1), 101-109. Elsevier Ltd. Retrieved December 10, 2019 from .

This record was imported from Teaching and Teacher Education: An International Journal of Research and Studies on January 31, 2019. Teaching and Teacher Education: An International Journal of Research and Studies is a publication of Elsevier.

Full text is availabe on Science Direct: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0742-051X(96)00030-3