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A comparison of high school social studies students' uses of digital and non-digital historical collections
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, , Georgia State University, United States

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, in Phoenix, AZ, USA ISBN 978-1-880094-55-6 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

This paper reports the questions of distinguishable differences in students' writing on a historical research question which results from the use of digital or non-digital historical resources. Two 11th grade United States history classes taught by the same teacher were provided background information and six documents related to the Cuban Missile Crisis. One class used paper versions and the other a web-based version. Our findings suggest that simple access to resources online does not make a difference. In fact, we found that paper documents may be easier to use and more productive for student historical inquiry. We present our findings as cautionary tale of how difficult it is to work with online historical primary historical sources. We also see the need for further research on the ways in which teachers can facilitate students' work with digital historical resources and collections.

Citation

Lee, J. & Clarke, G. (2005). A comparison of high school social studies students' uses of digital and non-digital historical collections. In C. Crawford, R. Carlsen, I. Gibson, K. McFerrin, J. Price, R. Weber & D. Willis (Eds.), Proceedings of SITE 2005--Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 3838-3841). Phoenix, AZ, USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved July 19, 2019 from .

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