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What Are You Looking At? An Investigation Into the Relationship of Text, Graphics, and Audio of a PowerPoint Presentation, Student Eye Movements and Science Learning
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, North Carolina State University, United States ; , James Madison University, United States

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, in Phoenix, AZ, USA ISBN 978-1-880094-55-6 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to use eye-tracking technology to explore the relationship of text and graphic combinations displayed in a PowerPoint presentation. The effect of an audio narration was also explored. A taxonomy of graphic/text relations was applied to slides in a presentation on the differentiation in the Galapagos Islands. Fifteen undergraduate students were eye-tracked in a university laboratory to determine their gaze points and subsequent point of interest. Results indicate that students paid greater attention to graphics with high relevance to the text, with and without added narration. Results also indicated that during the first five seconds that a student viewed a slide the relevance of the graphic to the text was influential as to how eye gaze was distributed between the two. In cases where the graphic was largely ornamental, this tended to be the text.

Citation

Annetta, L. & Slykhuis, D. (2005). What Are You Looking At? An Investigation Into the Relationship of Text, Graphics, and Audio of a PowerPoint Presentation, Student Eye Movements and Science Learning. In C. Crawford, R. Carlsen, I. Gibson, K. McFerrin, J. Price, R. Weber & D. Willis (Eds.), Proceedings of SITE 2005--Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 3620-3623). Phoenix, AZ, USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved May 22, 2019 from .

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