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Assigned to the margins: Teachers for minority and immigrant communities in Japan
ARTICLE

TATE Volume 22, Number 7 ISSN 0742-051X Publisher: Elsevier Ltd

Abstract

As communities of immigrant families gather in the low-income neighbourhoods of Tokyo and neighbouring cities, Japanese teachers face new challenges as well as the stigma of classrooms for immigrant children. Within the intricate politics of assignment in Japanese school districts, teachers and administrators can find themselves with students who are barely acknowledged and poorly served by mainstream Japanese schools and other community services. The interviews with teachers, principals, immigrant translators and other cultural intermediaries as well as numerous school visits focused on the ways in which teachers had been required to interrogate their pedagogies, practices and prejudices in order to be effective teachers of low income and immigrant youth. The results reveal strains in the lives and careers of teachers who work with marginalised youth in Japan and are addressed within a critical view of how Japanese schooling is responding to the needs of an increasingly heterogeneous urban population.

Citation

Gordon, J.A. Assigned to the margins: Teachers for minority and immigrant communities in Japan. Teaching and Teacher Education: An International Journal of Research and Studies, 22(7), 766-776. Elsevier Ltd. Retrieved October 21, 2019 from .

This record was imported from Teaching and Teacher Education: An International Journal of Research and Studies on January 28, 2019. Teaching and Teacher Education: An International Journal of Research and Studies is a publication of Elsevier.

Full text is availabe on Science Direct: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2006.04.028

Keywords