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What happens to children's education when their parents emigrate? Evidence from Sri Lanka
ARTICLE

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International Journal of Educational Development Volume 46, Number 1, ISSN 0738-0593 Publisher: Elsevier Ltd

Abstract

We examined the effects of parental emigration on the education of the children left behind in Sri Lanka. Using access to foreign employment agencies as a source of exogenous variation in parental migration, we estimated two-stage least squares models of the children's school enrolment, access to private tuition, class-age gap (the difference between a child's school year and the child's age), and educational spending. Overall, parental migration had no statistically significant effect on any of the outcomes; however, analyses by migrant gender show that the effects of parental migration were heterogeneous. When the mother migrates and the father stays behind, the education of the children worsens; when the father migrates and the mother stays behind, it improves. There is also some evidence that boys, younger children, and children of less-educated parents gain more from parental migration.

Citation

Sarma, V.J. & Parinduri, R.A. (2016). What happens to children's education when their parents emigrate? Evidence from Sri Lanka. International Journal of Educational Development, 46(1), 94-102. Elsevier Ltd. Retrieved October 14, 2019 from .

This record was imported from International Journal of Educational Development on January 28, 2019. International Journal of Educational Development is a publication of Elsevier.

Full text is availabe on Science Direct: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijedudev.2015.11.007

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