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Student Support in E-Learning Courses in Higher Education--Insights from a Metasynthesis "A Pedagogy of Panic Attacks"
ARTICLE

Africa Education Review Volume 8, Number 3, ISSN 1814-6627

Abstract

E-learning includes the use of the internet for accessing learning materials, interacting with learning content and with instructors and students to obtain support during the learning process in order to gain knowledge and personal meaning and to grow. It occurs when students have electronic access to resources and where they are in regular online contact with their peers and tutors. The primary objective of the metasynthesis was to analyse primary qualitative research studies on learner support in online courses to establish a guideline for e-learning support. The metamethod entailed thoughtful examination of the manner in which the methodological approach was used to gather and interpret the data. The metadata analysis involved reinterpretations of the actual findings from the primary qualitative studies. Lastly, the metatheory consisted of an examination of theories leading the primary researchers' topics, frameworks and research questions. Conducting a metastudy from a constructivist perspective as in this research meant that I functioned as the interpreter of primary research studies, translating what has been written by other researchers for the purpose of revealing similarities and differences, and developing practice guidelines or theoretical concepts on a specific phenomenon. I identified three main themes regarding student support in e-learning in higher education, technical problems (infrastructure and access), a panic attack (pedagogy) and a human contact (human factors).

Citation

Minnaar, A. (2011). Student Support in E-Learning Courses in Higher Education--Insights from a Metasynthesis "A Pedagogy of Panic Attacks". Africa Education Review, 8(3), 483-503. Retrieved November 22, 2019 from .

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