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Is Online Learning the Silver Bullet for Men of Color? An Institutional-Level Analysis of the California Community College System
ARTICLE

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Community College Journal of Research and Practice Volume 40, Number 8, ISSN 1066-8926

Abstract

The spread of online courses and programs in community colleges across the nation has contributed to a redefinition of open-access education. Accordingly, the growth in online courses has drawn attention to the value of different instructional modalities, particularly with regard to their effectiveness in learning, retention, and success. As a result, this study sought to determine whether or not there were differences in students' academic success and course retention for community college men by racial/ethnic affiliation. This study used institutional data on men enrolled in California's community college system to provide greater insight into the effect of online learning on student success. Findings illustrated that Asian, Black, Latino, and White men were more likely to have higher success outcomes when engaged in face-to-face modalities. There were no clear patterns in which online modality was better than others with regards to success, except for Black men. For these men, asynchronous with multimedia was identified as the second most effective online modality pertaining to success. This research has demonstrated the manifold benefits of face-to-face instruction. As such, face-to-face courses seemed to be the best type of modality for community college men. For that reason, careful consideration must be taken when promoting online learning to Asian, Black, Latino, and White men in community colleges. Though, further research is needed to better understand variation in the presentation of online learning materials and the structure of interactions within online classrooms.

Citation

Palacios, A.M.G. & Wood, J.L. (2016). Is Online Learning the Silver Bullet for Men of Color? An Institutional-Level Analysis of the California Community College System. Community College Journal of Research and Practice, 40(8), 643-655. Retrieved February 22, 2020 from .

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