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What I Taught My STEM Instructor about Teaching: What a Deaf Student Hears That Others Cannot
ARTICLE

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JSEFSWD Volume 18, Number 1,

Abstract

Overall, science teaching at the university level has remained in a relatively static state. There is much research and debate among university faculty regarding the most effective methods of teaching science. But it remains largely rhetoric. The traditional lecture model in STEM higher education is limping along in its march toward inclusion and equity. The NGSS and Common Core reform efforts do little to help university science teachers to change their orientation from largely lecture-driven practice with laboratory supplements. While it is impossible to address all diverse student groups, the need for accommodations tend to be overlooked. As a Deaf student and advocate, I felt responsible to share recommendations from this perspective regarding how exclusionary or inclusive National Reforms in Science Education can be.

Citation

Ross, A. & Yerrick, R.K. (2015). What I Taught My STEM Instructor about Teaching: What a Deaf Student Hears That Others Cannot. Journal of Science Education for Students with Disabilities, 18(1),. Retrieved January 21, 2020 from .

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