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Exploring the Educational Potential of Minecraft: The Case of 118 Elementary-School Students
PROCEEDINGS

,

International Association for Development of the Information Society (IADIS) International Conference on Educational Technologies,

Abstract

The goal of this study was to explore the educational potential of Minecraft. This project was conducted with 118 elementary-school students from Canada during the 2016-2017 school year. To explore the educational potential of Minecraft on the students, we designed a "Minecraft challenge" for students. 10 game levels of ascending difficulty were created for them, each containing 3 sublevels to pass before moving up to the next level. In order to advance to the "Minecraft Master level", the students had to complete a total of 30 tasks. A moderator specialized in Minecraft gameplay was present during the gaming sessions, which took place at the schools. Ten different types of data collection tools, such as online surveys, interviews, classroom observations, "think aloud" interviews during Minecraft gaming sessions, student-generated Minecraft "creations", etc. In this study, we first report on how Minecraft was used with those 118 elementary-school students. We then highlight the educational potential of Minecraft by describing how the use of Minecraft benefitted students in various aspects of their learning. These positive outcomes include, but are not limited to: an increase in motivation, the development of collaboration skills, the learning of computer programming, and the development of other computer science competencies. [For the complete proceedings, see ED579282.]

Citation

Karsenti, T. & Bugmann, J. (2017). Exploring the Educational Potential of Minecraft: The Case of 118 Elementary-School Students. Presented at International Association for Development of the Information Society (IADIS) International Conference on Educational Technologies 2017. Retrieved October 16, 2019 from .

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