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From paper and pencil to mobile phone photo notes-taking among Tanzanian university students: Extent, motives and impact on learning ARTICLE

, , , University of Dar es Salaam, Tanzania

IJEDICT Volume 14, Number 2, ISSN 1814-0556 Publisher: Open Campus, The University of the West Indies, West Indies

Abstract

This study examined the extent, motives and impact of mobile phone photo notes-taking on students’ learning at Dar es Salaam University College of Education (DUCE) in Tanzania. It employed the mixed methods approach. A sample of 310 respondents was drawn using a multi stage sampling technique which involved stratified random sampling at the first stage and convenient sampling at the second stage. Questionnaires and interviews were used to obtain data for the study. The findings revealed that mobile photo notes-taking was a common practice at DUCE. The time consuming nature of handwritten notes, Speedy lecturing, easy access to notes, peer and technological influence were claimed to be the motives behind students’ fondness to the practice. It was also revealed that the distraction of concentration, impairment of handwriting skills and speed, poor attendance to the lecture sessions, and distortion of students’ ability to compose and organize their own work were the impact of the practice. The study recommends that the University should create better teaching and learning environment to allow university students to use variables and multiple notes-taking methods for best results underlying each method.

Citation

Mfaume, H., Bilinga, M. & Mgaya, R. (2018). From paper and pencil to mobile phone photo notes-taking among Tanzanian university students: Extent, motives and impact on learning. International Journal of Education and Development using ICT, 14(2),. Open Campus, The University of the West Indies, West Indies. Retrieved September 18, 2018 from .

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