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An Analysis of Expectations for Artificial Intelligence-supporting Software in Mobile Learning PROCEEDING

, , Mejiro University, Japan

E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education, in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada ISBN 978-1-939797-31-5 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

Recent artificial intelligence (AI) technologies with speech language recognition have hatched various kinds of application software We conducted a preliminary survey of needs for such AI-supporting software in blended learning situation Undergraduate students who major in school education and attendants of decennial TOT (training of teachers) have experienced software evaluation session with mobile learning technologies and shared their ideas and opinion for the software in their teaching practices
The results derived from twenty-nine (29) junior undergraduate students who majors in primary school education and ninety-five (95) school teachers who enrolled in decennial TOT (training of teachers) showed their large differences in pedagogical point of view in terms of their ideas in the class

Citation

Fujitani, S. & Minemura, K. (2017). An Analysis of Expectations for Artificial Intelligence-supporting Software in Mobile Learning. In J. Dron & S. Mishra (Eds.), Proceedings of E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education (pp. 918-922). Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved October 16, 2018 from .

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