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The Effects of Recorded Lectures on Passing Rates in Online Math Courses.

, , Weber State University, United States

JCMST Volume 37, Number 2, ISSN 0731-9258 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Waynesville, NC USA

Abstract

In this mixed method study we investigate the impact of recorded lectures on passing rates in an online math course. For three years, we collected data from approximately 380 students enrolled in a first-year undergraduate online course, College Algebra. The data was used to compare the amount of time students spent watching recorded lectures and their final grades. The study reveals that students who watched more than half of the lectures were able to pass the course, and those who watched less than half of the lectures almost always did not pass the course. In this paper, we present the data and show the results. We also analyze the qualitative data and show the effects the recorded lectures had on student learning.

Citation

Fital-Akelbek, S. & Akelbek, M. (2018). The Effects of Recorded Lectures on Passing Rates in Online Math Courses. Journal of Computers in Mathematics and Science Teaching, 37(2), 93-109. Waynesville, NC USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved August 15, 2018 from .

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