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Effects of Extensive Engagement with Computer-Based Reading and Language Arts Instructional Software on Reading Achievement for Sixth Graders ARTICLE

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Journal on School Educational Technology Volume 6, Number 1, ISSN 0973-2217

Abstract

K-12 school practitioners and schools administrators need reliable results about the effects of instructional technology products as they strive to meet achievement compliance levels in politically accountable local and national contexts in the U.S. This study presents evidence regarding the effects of extensive engagement with computer-based instructional software on the reading achievement of 86 6th graders, within a backdrop of two previous similar investigations at the same middle school between AY 2003-2007. A treatment group received computer-based, reading instruction for 24 weeks x 90 minutes weekly in addition to four, 90 minute blocks of conventional instruction. Control peers received conventional instruction in five, 90 minute blocks per week. Comparisons of achievement scores on year-end, standardized reading tests yielded substantial gains for treatment subjects compared to controls, with an effect size of 0.92. Girls significantly outperformed boys and those not receiving lunch funding did significantly better than those receiving lunch funding. The conclusion is that extensive software engagement combined with in class instruction is an effective instructional context for enhancing reading achievement. Recommendations for further research suggest a "repeated trials" model in the same settings to give fidelity to curriculum, research methodology and the socio-cultural context for students and school.

Citation

Securro, S., Jones, J.D. & Cantrell, D.R. (2010). Effects of Extensive Engagement with Computer-Based Reading and Language Arts Instructional Software on Reading Achievement for Sixth Graders. Journal on School Educational Technology, 6(1), 60-69. Retrieved April 27, 2018 from .

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