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Online learner self-regulation: Learning presence viewed through quantitative content- and social network analysis
ARTICLE

, University at Albany - State University of New York ; , Empire State College - State University of New York ; , Lamar University ; , University at Albany - State University of New York ; , Furman University ; , Widener University ; , University at Albany, State University of New York ; , SUNY System Administration ; , University at Albany - State University of New York ; , Empire State College

IRRODL Volume 14, Number 3, ISSN 1492-3831 Publisher: Athabasca University Press

Abstract

This paper presents an extension of an ongoing study of online learning framed within the community of inquiry (CoI) model (Garrison, Anderson, & Archer, 2001) in which we further examine a new construct labeled as learning presence. We use learning presence to refer to the iterative processes of forethought and planning, monitoring and adapting strategies for learning, and reflecting on results that successful students use to regulate their learning in online, interactive environments. To gain insight into these processes, we present results of a study using quantitative content analysis (QCA) and social network analysis (SNA) in a complementary fashion. First, we used QCA to identify the forms of learning presence reflected in students’ public (class discussions) and more private (learning journals) products of knowledge construction in online, interactive components of a graduate-level blended course. Next, we used SNA to assess how the forms of learning presence we identified through QCA correlated with the network positions students held within those interactional spaces (i.e., discussions and journals). We found that the students who demonstrated better self- and co-regulation (i.e., learning presence) took up more advantageous positions in their knowledge-generating groups. Our results extend and confirm both the CoI framework and previous investigations of online learning using SNA.

Citation

Shea, P., Hayes, S., Uzuner Smith, S., Vickers, J., Bidjerano, T., Gozza-Cohen, M., Jian, S.B., Pickett, A., Wilde, J. & Tseng, C.H. (2013). Online learner self-regulation: Learning presence viewed through quantitative content- and social network analysis. The International Review of Research in Open and Distributed Learning, 14(3), 427-461. Athabasca University Press. Retrieved April 21, 2019 from .

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Cited By

  1. Inquiring into Presence as Support for Student Learning in a Blended Learning Classroom

    Mark Stevens, George Mason University, United States; Mary Rice, University of Kansas, United States

    Journal of Online Learning Research Vol. 2, No. 4 (Dec 31, 2016) pp. 447–473

  2. Semantic Text Theme Generation in Collaborative Online Learning Environments

    Andrew Lumpe, David Wicks, Robin Henrikson & Nalline Baliram, Seattle Pacific University, United States

    E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education 2015 (Oct 19, 2015) pp. 1837–1842

  3. Systemic View of Online Learning Communities: The connection between Communication, Cooperation and Collaboration

    Kashieka Popkin & Heather Lamb, University of North Texas, United States

    E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education 2014 (Oct 27, 2014) pp. 1603–1608

These links are based on references which have been extracted automatically and may have some errors. If you see a mistake, please contact info@learntechlib.org.