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Computer Games Application within Alternative Classroom Goal Structures: Cognitive, Metacognitive, and Affective Evaluation
ARTICLE

Educational Technology Research and Development Volume 56, Number 5, ISSN 1042-1629

Abstract

This article reports findings on a study of educational computer games used within various classroom situations. Employing an across-stage, mixed method model, the study examined whether educational computer games, in comparison to traditional paper-and-pencil drills, would be more effective in facilitating comprehensive math learning outcomes, and whether alternative classroom goal structures would enhance or reduce the effects of computer games. The findings indicated that computer games, compared with paper-and-pencil drills, were significantly more effective in promoting learning motivation but not significantly different in facilitating cognitive math test performance and metacognitive awareness. Additionally, this study established that alternative classroom goal structures mediated the effects of computer games on mathematical learning outcomes. Cooperative goal structure, as opposed to competitive and individualistic structures, significantly enhanced the effects of computer games on attitudes toward math learning.

Citation

Ke, F. (2008). Computer Games Application within Alternative Classroom Goal Structures: Cognitive, Metacognitive, and Affective Evaluation. Educational Technology Research and Development, 56(5), 539-556. Retrieved April 23, 2019 from .

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Cited By

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    Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2014 (Mar 17, 2014) pp. 665–669

  2. A synthesis on digital games in education: What the research literature says from 2000 to 2010

    Albert Ritzhaupt, Nathaniel Poling, Christopher Frey & Margeaux Johnson, University of Florida, United States

    Journal of Interactive Learning Research Vol. 25, No. 2 (April 2014) pp. 261–280

  3. Game-Based Language Learning: The Impact of Competition on Students’ Perceptions and Performances.

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    EdMedia + Innovate Learning 2011 (Jun 27, 2011) pp. 1480–1485

  4. Educational Games in the PK-12 Environment

    Cassidy Bennett, Amelia Weingart, Cathi Draper Rodriguez, Bude Su & Teresa Sundholm, California State University, Monterey Bay, United States

    Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2010 (Mar 29, 2010) pp. 3420–3426

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