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Using Mobile-Assisted Exercises to Support Students' Vocabulary Skill Development
ARTICLE

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Turkish Online Journal of Educational Technology Volume 14, Number 1, ISSN 1303-6521

Abstract

The use of mobile phones for learning has become well-known and is widely adopted in many language classes. The use of SMS for transmitting short messages is a fast way of helping students to learn vocabulary. To address this issue, this study was conducted to examine the effects of mobile-assisted vocabulary exercises on vocabulary acquisition of first-year students. Eighty students from two sections enrolled in a fundamental English course participated in the study. Each section consisted of 40 students. One of the groups was chosen as the experimental group, and the other as the control group. All students received the same amount of new words and dictation in class. Then only the students in the experimental group did vocabulary exercises on mobile phones via SMS. Those in the control group received paper-based exercises to be done in class. The instruments were pre-and post-vocabulary tests and a questionnaire surveying the students' attitudes toward mobile-assisted exercises. The findings revealed that vocabulary knowledge of students in the experimental group outperformed the control group. They used and learned target vocabulary better than those in the control group. Mobile-assisted vocabulary exercises had a significant effect on vocabulary ability of the students. The results of the questionnaire also illustrated their positive attitudes toward doing mobile-assisted exercises as a whole. It can be concluded that using mobile phones as a learning tool contributes to the success of students meanwhile increases their learning motivation.

Citation

Suwantarathip, O. & Orawiwatnakul, W. (2015). Using Mobile-Assisted Exercises to Support Students' Vocabulary Skill Development. Turkish Online Journal of Educational Technology, 14(1), 163-171. Retrieved November 15, 2019 from .

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