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Changing Literacy
ARTICLE

Teachers College Record Volume 105, Number 2, ISSN 0161-4681

Abstract

Current discussions about literacy often focus on how economic changes are raising expectations for literacy achievement. The emergence of a so-called knowledge economy or learning economy requires more people to do more things with print. Less attention has been given, however, to how the pressure to produce more literacy affects the contexts in which literacy learning takes place. This article looks at the literacy learning experience of an autoworker turned union representative, a blind computer programmer, two bilingual autodidacts, and a former southern sharecropper raising children in a high-tech university town. It uses the concept of the literacy sponsor to explore their access to learning and their responses to economic and technological change. Their experiences point to some directions for incorporating economic history into thinking about cultural diversity and for using resources in school to address economic turbulence and inequality beyond the school.

Citation

Brandt, D. (2003). Changing Literacy. Teachers College Record, 105(2), 245-260. Retrieved January 28, 2020 from .

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Keywords