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Using Digital Stories to Understand the Lives of Alaska Native Young People
ARTICLE

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Youth & Society Volume 46, Number 4, ISSN 0044-118X

Abstract

To better understand how young Alaska Native (Inupiaq) people are creatively responding to the tensions of growing up in a world markedly different from that of their parents and grandparents, the pilot study examined youth-produced digital stories as representations of their everyday lives, values, and identities. Two hundred and seventy-one youth–produced digital stories were examined and assigned descriptive attributes; of these, 31 stories were selected and subjected to a more rigorous coding and a thematic analysis. Findings fall into three main categories: self-representation, sites of achievement, and relationships. Participants' digital stories overwhelmingly depicted positive self-images that included both codified cultural values and pop cultural images to construct novel forms of cultural identity. The gendered depictions of achievement signal a need for more varied, valued, and accessible avenues for success for boys. Lastly, relationships were prominent in the stories, but there was an absence of young adult role models, particularly men, in the stories.

Citation

Wexler, L., Eglinton, K. & Gubrium, A. (2014). Using Digital Stories to Understand the Lives of Alaska Native Young People. Youth & Society, 46(4), 478-504. Retrieved April 25, 2019 from .

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Cited By

  1. Designing for Learning Engagement in Remote Communities: Narratives from North of Sixty

    Aaron Doering & Jeni Henrickson

    Canadian Journal of Learning and Technology / La revue canadienne de l’apprentissage et de la technologie Vol. 40, No. 3 (Dec 14, 2014)

  2. Designing for Learning Engagement in Remote Communities: Narratives from North of Sixty / Concevoir pour favoriser la participation active à l’apprentissage dans les communautés éloignées : récits d’Au nord du soixantième parallèle

    Aaron Doering & Jeni Henrickson, Learning Technologies Media Lab College of Education & Human Development University of Minnesota

    Canadian Journal of Learning and Technology / La revue canadienne de l’apprentissage et de la technologie Vol. 40, No. 3 (Dec 14, 2014)

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