You are here:

Laptop Use, Interactive Science Software, and Science Learning among At-Risk Students
ARTICLE

, , ,

Journal of Science Education and Technology Volume 23, Number 4, ISSN 1059-0145

Abstract

This year-long, quasi-experimental study investigated the impact of the use of netbook computers and interactive science software on fifth-grade students' science learning processes, academic achievement, and interest in further science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) study within a linguistically diverse school district in California. Analysis of students' state standardized science test scores indicated that the program helped close gaps in scientific achievement between at-risk learners (i.e., English learners, Hispanics, and free/reduced-lunch recipients) and their counterparts. Teacher and student interviews and classroom observations suggested that computer-supported visual representations and interactions supported diverse learners' scientific understanding and inquiry and enabled more individualized and differentiated instruction. Finally, interviews revealed that the program had a positive impact on students' motivation in science and on their interest in pursuing science-related careers. This study suggests that technology-facilitated science instruction is beneficial for improving at-risk students' science achievement, scaffolding students' scientific understanding, and strengthening students' motivation to pursue STEM-related careers.

Citation

Zheng, B., Warschauer, M., Hwang, J.K. & Collins, P. (2014). Laptop Use, Interactive Science Software, and Science Learning among At-Risk Students. Journal of Science Education and Technology, 23(4), 591-603. Retrieved April 26, 2019 from .

This record was imported from ERIC on November 3, 2015. [Original Record]

ERIC is sponsored by the Institute of Education Sciences (IES) of the U.S. Department of Education.

Copyright for this record is held by the content creator. For more details see ERIC's copyright policy.

Keywords

View References & Citations Map

Cited By

  1. Parents' Perceptions and Concerns of a 1:1 Laptop Initiative: Implications for Teacher Education

    Yi Jin & Denise Schmidt-Crawford, Iowa State University, United States

    Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2017 (Mar 05, 2017) pp. 776–783

  2. Comparison of Technology Use Between Biology and Physics Teachers in a 1:1 Laptop Environment

    Simon J. Crook, Manjula D. Sharma & Rachel Wilson, University of Sydney, Australia

    Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education Vol. 15, No. 2 (June 2015) pp. 126–160

These links are based on references which have been extracted automatically and may have some errors. If you see a mistake, please contact info@learntechlib.org.