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Technological Modeling: Faculty Use of Technologies in Preservice Teacher Education from 2004 to 2012
article

, , , University of Texas at Austin, United States

CITE Journal Volume 16, Number 2, ISSN 1528-5804 Publisher: Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education, Waynesville, NC USA

Abstract

This 7-year, cross-sectional study of a 1:1 laptop teacher preparatory program in the United States examined the nature and change in faculty technological modeling. Using survey methods, preservice teachers (n = 932) reported their faculty’s use of technological activities in coursework. Through descriptive statistics, chi-square tests, and qualitative analysis, researchers found change in the number of faculty members incorporating presentation, word processing, email, learning management systems, and digital video activities in coursework. Emergent activities with low but increasing use included digital audio, social networking, text messaging, and blog activities. Less widely reported activities included social bookmarking, desktop publishing, webpage creation, and games. Overall results indicated all students did not report similar faculty technological modeling, which also meant that students had divergent technological experiences from which to base their future teaching. The discussion outlines an expansion of educational technology integration across teacher education methods/content courses to increase systematic and contemporary coverage of technological advancements in education through codeveloped curriculum and coteaching by educational technology and teacher education faculty.

Citation

Hughes, J.E., Liu, S. & Lim, M. (2016). Technological Modeling: Faculty Use of Technologies in Preservice Teacher Education from 2004 to 2012. Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education, 16(2), 184-207. Waynesville, NC USA: Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education. Retrieved July 24, 2019 from .

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