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Feeling Anxious: Students’ Perceptions and Emotions Relative to Online Assessments in College Courses
PROCEEDINGS

, University of Arizona, United States

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, in Las Vegas, NV, United States ISBN 978-1-939797-13-1 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

Technology-based testing tools are being utilized in a variety of college course types (e.g., online, face-to-face). Though online assessments are often designed to provide students flexibility and ease, students’ perceptions of these assessments have not been fully interrogated. Providing student narratives about online testing or quizzing experiences, this research interpretively analyzes student stories about and experiences with online assessments, specifically timed exams and quizzes. The student narratives as data are drawn from across hybrid college courses – those relying on similar online assessment types – on two large, western, public campuses, and this paper presents findings thematically. This research suggests that students enjoy immediate feedback on their performance, but are often concerned about their teacher not being ‘there’ during online exams and quizzes. Overall, these data show that students experience anxiety relative to online testing events.

Citation

Brooks, C. (2015). Feeling Anxious: Students’ Perceptions and Emotions Relative to Online Assessments in College Courses. In D. Rutledge & D. Slykhuis (Eds.), Proceedings of SITE 2015--Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 10-15). Las Vegas, NV, United States: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved April 19, 2019 from .