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More than the STEM grew… A study of barriers to and benefits of using Web 2.0 collaborative technologies on a blended teacher professional development programme for integrating Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) in Trinidad. PROCEEDINGS

, University of the West Indies, St Augustine, Trinidad And Tobago ; , University of the West Indies, Trinidad And Tobago

E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education, in New Orleans, LA, USA ISBN 978-1-939797-12-4 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

A mixed research study was conducted, using data from teachers at four Early Childhood centres whose initial skills ranged from never turning on a computer to being comfortable with using digital technologies. Survey data, focus group interview data, STEM conference visitor log comments, teachers' reflective blogs and digital collaboration responses were analysed. The findings revealed that the teachers used few digital technologies prior to the training but subsequently used and facilitated students interacting with Web 2.0 communication and collaboration tools. Web usage increased during and after the training. Unique and surprising unanticipated teacher-benefits emerged, with teachers gaining greater confidence in and ability to model Web 2.0 communication and collaboration skills for their students.Teachers saw increased student confidence when sharing presentations. Parents and the wider community too witnessed and recorded increased enthusiasm and willingness of students to learn

Citation

Figaro-Henry, S. & Abdul-Majied, S. (2014). More than the STEM grew… A study of barriers to and benefits of using Web 2.0 collaborative technologies on a blended teacher professional development programme for integrating Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) in Trinidad. In T. Bastiaens (Ed.), Proceedings of E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education 2014 (pp. 566-575). Chesapeake, VA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE).