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Trial and Error: The Use of Computer-Aided Instruction for Basic Readers and Writers
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Abstract

Word processors can enhance the reading and writing skills of underprepared college students in a special course combining reading and writing. Word processors may serve such a course in many ways: (1) storing and retrieving students' own unpublished resource materials; (2) moving large blocks of writing at the flick of a finger; (3) serving as reading and writing tutors; (4) checking spelling and grammar; (5) coaching speed reading; (6) testing and evaluating; and (7) record keeping. Computer-aided instruction provides an opportunity for instructors of underprepared students to view students mastering the demands of a new skill, as well as a chance for students themselves, their classmates, or instructors to intervene in the writing process. The high visibility of the computer screen has made writing a more overt operation capable of study by the average classroom teacher. The computer is an excellent tool for educational researchers, a tool whose full capacity has not yet been tapped. (Author/RS)

Citation

Pomper, M.M. Trial and Error: The Use of Computer-Aided Instruction for Basic Readers and Writers. Retrieved December 10, 2019 from .

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