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Information science instruction and changes in girls' and boy's expectancy and value beliefs: In search of gender-equitable pedagogical practices
ARTICLE

Computers & Education Volume 64, Number 1, ISSN 0360-1315 Publisher: Elsevier Ltd

Abstract

In this study, which was situated in the context of information science instruction, data were collected twice using student self-reports to examine the effects of pedagogical practices on changes in boys' and girls' expectancy and value beliefs about computing. Participants were 326 7th-grade students, enrolled in three middle schools that were located in a Greek metropolitan city. At both times boys expressed more positive intrinsic-value beliefs about computing. Teachers' pedagogical practices had effects on students' motivation. All students benefited from practices that highlighted the social benefits and applications of technology. Also, girls benefited from practices that connected information science to other school subjects and boys from practices encouraging social interaction. Findings challenge some assumptions about gender/technology relations and have implications for teaching about technology in a gender-equitable way.

Citation

Vekiri, I. (2013). Information science instruction and changes in girls' and boy's expectancy and value beliefs: In search of gender-equitable pedagogical practices. Computers & Education, 64(1), 104-115. Elsevier Ltd. Retrieved April 20, 2019 from .

This record was imported from Computers & Education on January 29, 2019. Computers & Education is a publication of Elsevier.

Full text is availabe on Science Direct: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.compedu.2013.01.011

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Cited By

  1. Learner perceptions versus technology usage: A study of adolescent English learners in Hong Kong secondary schools

    Cynthia Lee, School of Education and Languages; Alexander Seeshing Yeung, Institute for Positive Psychology and Education, Australia; Kwok Wai Cheung, Department of Computer Studies

    Computers & Education Vol. 133, No. 1 (May 2019) pp. 13–26

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