You are here:

Improving science literacy: The knowledge-transforming process within an on-line professional development project
DISSERTATION

, State University of New York at Albany, United States

State University of New York at Albany . Awarded

Abstract

This study examined connections between science literacy and writing. Science e-mails were written as content-oriented professional development materials for K-8 teachers. E-mail drafts underwent multiple revisions. The study data included drafts, final e-mails, and feedback from the supervising scientist and the e-mails' teacher audience. The analyses, informed by Bereiter & Scardamalia's knowledge-transforming process (1987), Schindler's audience theories (2001), and Johnson and Aragon's on-line instruction framework (2003), sought connections among three components: the writer's struggle between content and discourse, audience, and format. The e-mail drafts indicated a large percentage of text changes involving two or more of the components, primarily concerning discourse. Redundancies surfaced among the components, indicating Bereiter and Scardamalia's knowledge-transforming process sufficiently explained the e-mail project; additional format and audience models were unnecessary. Recommendations for extending the knowledge-transforming process specifically for science are included.

Citation

Sherwood, S.A. Improving science literacy: The knowledge-transforming process within an on-line professional development project. Ph.D. thesis, State University of New York at Albany. Retrieved October 18, 2019 from .

This record was imported from ProQuest on October 23, 2013. [Original Record]

Citation reproduced with permission of ProQuest LLC.

For copies of dissertations and theses: (800) 521-0600/(734) 761-4700 or https://dissexpress.umi.com

Keywords