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Technology adoption applied to educational settings: Predicting interventionists' use of video-self modeling
DISSERTATION

, Indiana University, United States

Indiana University . Awarded

Abstract

Technology provides educators with a significant advantage in working with today's students. One particular application of technology for the purposes of academic and behavioral interventions is the use of video self-modeling (VSM). Although VSM is an evidence-based intervention, it is rarely used in educational settings. The present research study tested a model of predicting educators' use of technology-based interventions, by accounting for perceived usefulness, perceived ease of use, and treatment acceptability. Eighty-one interventionists completed a survey designed to measure perceptions of VSM. A factor analysis supported a three factor model for the data (i.e., usefulness, ease of use, and treatment acceptability). A sequential multiple regression indicated that a significant portion of interventionists' intentions to use VSM can be accounted by perceptions concerning the usefulness of digital camcorders, the ease of using digital camcorders, and the acceptability of the treatment. Each independent variable accounted for a significant portion of interventionists' intention to use VSM. Professional development sessions intended to improve intentions to use technology-based interventions, like VSM, should specifically target technology variables (i.e., usefulness and ease of use) along with treatment acceptability. A three-month follow-up survey sought to determine the variance in interventions' actual use of the intervention, which can be accounted for by intentions to use the intervention. Due to low response rates and low variability in actual use of the intervention, analysis of the follow-up data was inappropriate.

Citation

Heckman, A.R. Technology adoption applied to educational settings: Predicting interventionists' use of video-self modeling. Ph.D. thesis, Indiana University. Retrieved October 14, 2019 from .

This record was imported from ProQuest on October 23, 2013. [Original Record]

Citation reproduced with permission of ProQuest LLC.

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