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Understanding resistance to use of asynchronous discussions as a common practice in training for business use DISSERTATION

, Capella University, United States

Capella University . Awarded

Abstract

In this knowledge-based economy, corporations invest millions of dollars in training and expect a return on that investment; similarly, employees have a vested interest in wanting to further their knowledge and ability to contribute. The types of e-learning strategies and instructional methods being employed elude the use of asynchronous discussion as a viable instructional method. The purpose of the study was to identify factors that might prevent a company from employing the use of asynchronous discussion technology as a usable e-learning method. Literature from academia was used to provide a rationale for why asynchronous discussion may work for corporate training. Using mixed-methods methodology, data were collected through surveys, interviews, and extant data from the learning management system and company records. By exploring the use of collaborative learning tools in a business context, exploring the factors that might prevent a company from employing these tools and gaining knowledge about the resistance to using collaborative learning tools for training, this study may help to change the way organizations think about using asynchronous discussion as an instructional strategy to deliver training. The study showed that while asynchronous discussions are a viable instructional strategy that can be used in a business setting, there is evidence that a training intervention, while effective, does not work alone to impact performance. Binder's (2009) Six Boxes® model was used as a framework to discuss implications for research and practice. Recommendations were made for further research regarding methods to improve performance with the use of asynchronous discussion as an instructional strategy.

Citation

Czeropski, S.M. Understanding resistance to use of asynchronous discussions as a common practice in training for business use. Ph.D. thesis, Capella University. Retrieved October 19, 2018 from .

This record was imported from ProQuest on October 23, 2013. [Original Record]

Citation reproduced with permission of ProQuest LLC.

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