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Computerized business systems training for employees at Virginia public colleges and universities
DISSERTATION

, University of Virginia, United States

University of Virginia . Awarded

Abstract

The higher education literature has documented that technology and its optimal utilization have emerged as critical issues for colleges and universities in the 1990s. Inadequate training on computerized business systems is one of the key problems facing administrative components of academic institutions as they incorporate technology into daily operations. As Virginia's colleges and universities face the challenge of technology and as they increasingly computerize their business systems, they need to train their employees adequately in order to maximize their use of technology. The purpose of this study was to determine the various methods (and their effectiveness) of training employees to use computerized business systems in Virginia's 15 four-year public higher education institutions. The study focused solely on the administrative components of these colleges and universities. A telephone interview and a written survey were used to gather data about how employees are trained. At least one individual working in a department delivering business system training provided information from each institution.

The results of the study revealed that 14 of the 15 public colleges and universities in the Commonwealth train employees to use computerized business systems. The more effective training programs train a larger volume and wider range of employees and establish stronger connections with employees than do other programs. Characteristics of effective training programs include support of senior level administrators; use of a wide variety of training methods such as classroom instruction and CD-ROMs; availability of training at the employee work site; application of a variety of methods to involve employees, such as formal mentoring programs and information exchange groups; use of instructors with teaching experience in addition to technical expertise; requirement of fees for at least some classes; and hiring of outside companies (sometimes on a short-term basis) to deliver training. One key characteristic of effective programs is that the administrators and instructors are constantly exploring innovative ways to deliver training and maximize resources.

Recommendations are made to administrators for increasing the effectiveness of training programs.

Citation

Lockhart, M.S. Computerized business systems training for employees at Virginia public colleges and universities. Ph.D. thesis, University of Virginia. Retrieved January 19, 2020 from .

This record was imported from ProQuest on October 23, 2013. [Original Record]

Citation reproduced with permission of ProQuest LLC.

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