You are here:

A comparison of the effects of personality characteristics and electronic activity rates on student achievement in an electronic university learning environment
DISSERTATION

, Texas A&M University - Commerce, United States

Texas A&M University - Commerce . Awarded

Abstract

The major purpose of this study was to determine the effects and interactions of university business students' personality preferences and electronic activity rates on student achievement in a web-based university learning environment. The minor purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between ethnicity and personality preferences, the relationship between age and personality preferences, and the relationship between gender and personality preferences. One hundred-six undergraduates and 156 graduate students enrolled in business web-based courses were administered the Keirsey Temperament Sorter to identify personality preferences and a student data collection form. Student personality preferences and electronic activity did not have a significant effect on student achievement for both the undergraduate and graduate students, although there was a significant interaction at alpha < .05 between the undergraduate personality preferences Feeling/Thinking and electronic activity. There was a significant relationship at alpha < .05 between the graduate student personality preferences Feeling/Thinking and ethnicity. The undergraduate preferences, Extraversion/Introversion and Sensing/Intuition, were significant as well, but the cell counts were not satisfactory to confirm significance. The residuals showed that there were personality preference differences among the ethnic groups. There was a significant relationship at alpha < .05 between the undergraduate personality preferences Sensing/Intuition and gender. The graduate students experienced no significant relationships between the two. There were no significant relationships between personality preferences and age groups for both the undergraduate and graduate students age groups, although the residuals did show some differences in preferred preferences among the age groups. Personality preferences and electronic activity did not affect student achievement in an electronic learning environment, yet the interaction of personality preferences and electronic activity did react. Faculty aware of student personality preferences can design more effective teaching methods, while students aware of their personality preferences can be more effective learners.

Citation

Le Sage, T.S. A comparison of the effects of personality characteristics and electronic activity rates on student achievement in an electronic university learning environment. Ph.D. thesis, Texas A&M University - Commerce. Retrieved January 25, 2020 from .

This record was imported from ProQuest on October 23, 2013. [Original Record]

Citation reproduced with permission of ProQuest LLC.

For copies of dissertations and theses: (800) 521-0600/(734) 761-4700 or https://dissexpress.umi.com

Keywords