You are here:

Self-Directed and Transforming Outlier Classroom Teachers as Global Connectors in Experiential Learning
DISSERTATION

, Walden University, United States

Walden University . Awarded

Abstract

Self-directed, outlier K-12 teachers use social media to develop a global and collaborative pedagogy openly shared with online stakeholders to develop connected, experiential teaching and learning. The purpose of this study was to record and explore the experiences of 4 K-12 classroom self-directed, outlier teachers who use social media to develop connected, experiential teaching and learning. The research questions focused on their lived experiences and perceptions about how they integrated digital social media, collaborated, and established global connections into their teaching practices. Questions also examined how teachers overcame barriers to the implementation of their new pedagogy. The conceptual framework included Siemens's connectivism and Dewey's experiential learning theories. This qualitative study used narrative inquiry and phenomenology methods. Data were collected through 2 semi-structured interviews and an analysis of digital text. Manual and electronic coding of data was conducted to identify rich themes and patterns. The findings indicated participants felt a high sense of agency toward developing a global and collaborative pedagogy; were committed to lifelong learning for themselves, colleagues, and students through communication with the global community; and used digital social media to achieve collaborative and globally inclusive learning. The research demonstrates that cognition developed in a connected, experiential framework prepares learners to be productive citizens in the digital age. The findings facilitate positive social change by providing guidance for the education community to conceptualize and apply connected, experiential pedagogy reliant on collaborative and global practices.

Citation

Arteaga, S. Self-Directed and Transforming Outlier Classroom Teachers as Global Connectors in Experiential Learning. Ph.D. thesis, Walden University. Retrieved October 22, 2019 from .

This record was imported from ProQuest on October 23, 2013. [Original Record]

Citation reproduced with permission of ProQuest LLC.

For copies of dissertations and theses: (800) 521-0600/(734) 761-4700 or https://dissexpress.umi.com

Keywords