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The effects of music teacher beliefs, training, and resources on use of technology
DISSERTATION

, The Florida State University, United States

The Florida State University . Awarded

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to compare teacher beliefs about music technology, types of teacher training in music technology, music technology resource availability, and levels of teacher use of music technology based on school socioeconomic status, teacher age, number of years teaching, and teacher gender. High-school band directors from the state of Virginia, completed a survey regarding beliefs, training, use, and access to music technology resources at their school. Comparisons were made between groups based on school size, socioeconomic status, director gender, age, and years of teaching experience.

Results indicated the typical high school band director was found to: (1) either be self-taught or to have taken a college course in electronic musical instruments, (2) have no formal training in MIDI music production, (3) have no formal training or have taken a college course in digital audio production, (4) either be self-taught or have taken a college course in music notation software, (5) no formal training in technology-assisted learning, (6) self-taught in multimedia, and (7) self-taught in productivity tools. Most had access to: (1) one computer station including electronic musical instruments, (2) no MIDI music production resources, (3) one computer station including digital audio production resources, (4) one computer station including music notation software, (5) no resources for technology-assisted learning software, (6) either one station or a general computer lab for use of multimedia, and (7) a general computer lab including resources for productivity tools.

In regard to personal use, the typical high school instrumental music educator was found to: (1) use electronic musical instruments on a weekly basis, (2) never use MIDI music production, (3) use digital audio production software on a monthly basis, (4) use music notation software on a weekly basis, (5) never use technology-assisted learning, (6) use multimedia on a monthly basis, and (7) use productivity tools daily. Teacher instructional use responses revealed the typical high school instrumental music educator was found to: (1) use electronic musical instruments in instruction on a monthly basis, (2) never use MIDI music production in instruction, (3) never use digital audio production in instruction, (4) use music notation software in instruction on a weekly basis, (5) never use technology-assisted learning software in instruction, (6) use multimedia in instruction monthly, and (7) use productivity tools in instruction weekly.

Teachers stated their students: (1) never use electronic musical instruments, MIDI music production, digital audio production, music notation software, technology-assisted learning software, nor multimedia in class. Student were reported to use productivity tools in class.

Significant differences were found in access to resources based upon school socioeconomic status with a greater access to resources primarily in schools of lower socioeconomic status (electronic musical instruments, MIDI music production, digital audio production, music notation software, technology-assisted learning software, multimedia). Also, schools of lower socioeconomic status tended to use music technology significantly more than those of moderate and higher status (teacher use of MIDI music production, teacher use of digital audio production, overall teacher use index). Female teachers had significantly higher beliefs in the effectiveness of music technology (technology-assisted learning and overall beliefs index) while male teachers had significantly more access to resources (electronic musical instruments) and used technology significantly more (teacher use of MIDI music production and student use of productivity tools).

Teachers in the youngest age group had significantly more training in music technology (electronic musical instruments, music notation software, technology-assisted learning software, and overall training index) than those in the higher age group. Likewise, teachers with the fewest years of experience had significantly more training in music technology (electronic musical instruments, notation, and overall training index) than their more experienced groups. Although, teachers in the older age group had more access to MIDI music production resources. Teachers with more experience used more MIDI music production.

Citation

Sorah, D.W. The effects of music teacher beliefs, training, and resources on use of technology. Ph.D. thesis, The Florida State University. Retrieved April 22, 2019 from .

This record was imported from ProQuest on October 23, 2013. [Original Record]

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