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Trends and perceptions of health care professionals on the use and effectiveness of computer-based training
DISSERTATION

, Temple University, United States

Temple University . Awarded

Abstract

This study investigated trends and perceptions of health care professionals on the use and effectiveness of computer-based training (CBT) to address the problem of why health care faculty and trainers are not using CBT technology.

Faculty and trainers in the health care profession are being asked to embrace computer-based technology. However, is it prudent to make such an investment, if experienced health care faculty and trainers are not using the expensive tools for actual instruction?

This descriptive study investigated a purposeful target sample of health care faculty and trainers who are experienced users of computer-based training programs to gather “information rich” data. This data can be used as a resource for health care administrators in their decision-making process towards implementing CBT as an instructional strategy.

A questionnaire was used to survey experienced health care faculty and trainers who use CBT to help health care administrators plan for the effective incorporation of CBT. A purposeful sampling of 302 health care professionals who used CBT in instruction was surveyed. Important features of CBT identified were self-paced instruction, receiving instruction at any location and interactive learning. Obstacles to CBT use identified were outside vendor development cost, in-house development expenses and lack of funding sources.

Citation

DeRosa-Melnick, M.E. Trends and perceptions of health care professionals on the use and effectiveness of computer-based training. Ph.D. thesis, Temple University. Retrieved November 13, 2019 from .

This record was imported from ProQuest on October 23, 2013. [Original Record]

Citation reproduced with permission of ProQuest LLC.

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