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University technology transfer and information processing: The influence of factors and fit DISSERTATION

, State University of New York at Albany, United States

State University of New York at Albany . Awarded

Abstract

Technology transfer has historically been viewed as the exchange and processing of information among those who create a technology and future users of the technology. Recent research has focused on expanding this view. As a result, the concept has evolved from the exchange of information to a multi-staged process where organizational and environmental factors play a key role. Research on university technology transfer has focused on identifying university-specific technology transfer outcomes, measures for these outcomes and on identifying factors that impact outcomes. However, there is little research examining how these factors interact within a university setting or how information processes are shaped by these factors.

This study examined the influence of internal and external environmental factors on the technology transfer process and information processing environment of university technology transfer offices. Interview data and documentation was analyzed from 16 institutions of higher education within New York State. The results indicate that no single factor has a dominant influence on the technology transfer process and numerous dependencies and interactions exist. In addition, several new factors were identified. All of the factors were integrated into an information processing framework, providing a holistic view of the process—one that incorporates information issues and broader aspects of the process. Information processing fit was also analyzed for its impact on the technology transfer process.

Citation

Pelish, M.D. University technology transfer and information processing: The influence of factors and fit. Ph.D. thesis, State University of New York at Albany. Retrieved May 21, 2018 from .

This record was imported from ProQuest on October 23, 2013. [Original Record]

Citation reproduced with permission of ProQuest LLC.

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