You are here:

Computer-based auditory training to improve speech recognition in noise by children with hearing impairment
DISSERTATION

, The University of Texas at Dallas, United States

The University of Texas at Dallas . Awarded

Abstract

Over the past 20 years there have been substantial improvements in hearing-assistive technology to provide children with hearing impairment more access to auditory information, however understanding speech in noise is still a challenge. Individuals with hearing loss have difficulty hearing in noise because they are less able to process information in the brief spectral and temporal regions of the speech signal where the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) becomes favorable. This process is known as glimpsing. Individuals with normal hearing are able to take advantage of the fluctuations between the signal and background noise because they are less susceptible to masking effects. Researchers have compared speech recognition in interrupted and continuous noise and indicated that individuals with normal hearing experience a perceptual advantage in interrupted noise. In addition, after repeated trials adults with normal hearing demonstrate an improvement in speech recognition in interrupted noise.

The focus of the current investigation was to determine if speech recognition in noise by children with hearing impairment can be improved through auditory training in noise. Phase 1 was to determine the initial starting signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and step-size of the SNR at the 80% speech-recognition performance level in interrupted and continuous noise for children with hearing impairment. Performance–intensity functions in interrupted and continuous noise with 10 children with moderate-to-severe hearing loss were used to determine the starting level and step-size SNR for auditory training.

In phase 2, the first aim was to determine if 7 hours of auditory training in interrupted noise results in a significant improvement of speech recognition in noise compared to auditory training in continuous noise immediately following training. The second aim was to evaluate the maintenance of speech recognition in interrupted and continuous noise 3 months following auditory training. Data were collected on 24 children with moderate-to-severe hearing loss following 7 hours of auditory training in the following groups: auditory training in interrupted noise (ATI), auditory training in continuous noise (ATC), and visual training in quiet (VTQ). Results indicated that the ATI group demonstrated significantly greater improvement in speech recognition than ATC and VTQ in interrupted and continuous noise conditions.

Citation

Sullivan, J.R. Computer-based auditory training to improve speech recognition in noise by children with hearing impairment. Ph.D. thesis, The University of Texas at Dallas. Retrieved August 21, 2019 from .

This record was imported from ProQuest on October 23, 2013. [Original Record]

Citation reproduced with permission of ProQuest LLC.

For copies of dissertations and theses: (800) 521-0600/(734) 761-4700 or https://dissexpress.umi.com

Keywords