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Three-dimensional visualization using solid-model methods: A comparative study of engineering and technology students
DISSERTATION

, Northern Illinois University, United States

Northern Illinois University . Awarded

Abstract

This quasi-experiment investigated the research questions, “Will students achieve higher test scores if three-dimensional computer-aided modeling methods are used when teaching cognitive spatial visualization skills?” and “Will students with strong or weak background experiences achieve higher test scores if three-dimensional computer-aided modeling methods are used when teaching cognitive spatial visualization skills?”

Three intact classes of engineering graphics and two intact classes of technical drawing in a college of engineering at the university level were assigned to either the control or experimental groups. Both control and experimental groups received identical lectures. The control groups completed two-dimensional computer-aided design laboratory assignments. The experimental groups completed three-dimensional computer-aided modeling laboratory assignments. The treatment phase was for one term (16 weeks).

The Purdue Spatial-Visualization Test/Visualization of Rotations was used for evaluation purposes. This test was used as Pretest (Week 1), Posttest I (Week 9), and a Posttest II (Week 16). Each group's ability in cognitive spatial visualization was analyzed for its level of significance using the t test for independent means or one-way analysis of variance. The findings indicated that there were no significant differences between the three-dimensional and two-dimensional groups' performance at the first week (p = .319), ninth week p = .638), and 16th week (p = .079) intervals. The findings indicated that there was a significant (p = .028) difference between the two-dimensional strong and two-dimensional weak background experience groups' performance at the Week 1 interval. The two-dimensional strong background experience group performed at a higher level. There were no significant (p = .303) differences between the groups' performance at the eight-week interval. There was a significant difference (p = .022) between the three-dimensional weak and two-dimensional strong background experience groups at the l6th-week interval. The two-dimensional strong background experience group performed at a higher level. These findings should encourage teachers to incorporate and use three-dimensional methods of instruction.

Citation

Godfrey, G.S. Three-dimensional visualization using solid-model methods: A comparative study of engineering and technology students. Ph.D. thesis, Northern Illinois University. Retrieved April 22, 2021 from .

This record was imported from ProQuest on October 23, 2013. [Original Record]

Citation reproduced with permission of ProQuest LLC.

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