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The relationship of technology use to perception of instructional quality
DISSERTATION

, Ohio University, United States

Ohio University . Awarded

Abstract

This study examined student’s perceptions of different forms of technology use for instruction purposes by faculty and whether these different forms of technology can predict instructional quality. The study sought to explore whether different forms of technology: Productivity Tools, Presentation Tools, Communication Tools, and World Wide Web Tools, reliably predict instructional quality. The study also aimed at examining which of the predictors is more important in predicting instructional quality.

Data were collected with an online questionnaire comprising three parts. Part I of the instrument collected demographic information. Part II was designed to measure faculty instructional quality as perceived by students. Part III of the instrument relates to the various forms of technology and the seven principles of good practice in undergraduate education (Chickering & Gamson, 1991). A large Midwestern University Teacher Education program was the accessible population from which a convenient sample was drawn. A total of 121 responses were used in the analysis. The response rate of the study was 56.6%. Descriptive statistics and inferential statistics were used to analyze the data.

Results of the analysis revealed that approximately 57% of the variance of the student evaluation of Instructional Quality can be accounted for by the linear combination of Productivity Tools, Presentation Tools, Communication Tools, and World Wide Web Tools. The analysis indicated that only two of the independent variables, Productivity Tools and Presentation Tools contributed significantly to the regression.

Findings from the supplementary multiple regression analysis of the independent variables: Faculty encourages student and faculty interaction scale - S1, Faculty promotes cooperation among students scale - S2, Faculty promotes active learning techniques scale - S3, Faculty gives prompt feedback scale - S4, Faculty emphasizes time on task scale - S5, Faculty communicates high expectations scale - S6 and Faculty respects diverse talents and ways of learning scale - S7 was statistically significant in predicting Instructional Quality. Thirty seven percent of the variance of the student evaluation of Instructional Quality can be accounted for by the linear combination of; S1, S2, S3, S4, S5, S6 and S7 scale.

Findings from the null hypothesis and the supplementary analysis converge to indicate combination of Productivity Tools, Presentation Tools, Communication Tools, and World Wide Web Tools can predict Instructional Quality. Among the predictors Presentation Tool emerged as the most important predictor of Instructional Quality. The combination of the independent variables S1, S2, S3, S4, S5, S6 and S7 was statistically significant in predicting Instructional Quality.

Citation

Akyeampong, A.S. The relationship of technology use to perception of instructional quality. Ph.D. thesis, Ohio University. Retrieved November 17, 2019 from .

This record was imported from ProQuest on October 23, 2013. [Original Record]

Citation reproduced with permission of ProQuest LLC.

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Keywords